How to Achieve a Green Revolution in Africa

Even though the present status of agriculture looks precarious, the governement of South Sudan hopes that increased extension services, adoption of modern technology and support from donors and international organizations will lead to a permanent solution to the food shortage problem. Angelo Bernard Badi stands between rows of planted potatoes at a local farm in Magwi.
Even though the present status of agriculture looks precarious, the governement of South Sudan hopes that increased extension services, adoption of modern technology and support from donors and international organizations will lead to a permanent solution to the food shortage problem. Angelo Bernard Badi stands between rows of planted potatoes at a local farm in Magwi.

A new study by the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa finds ways to promote small-scale farming by focusing on crops that make up most people’s diets – ending hunger on the continent.

Africa has 60 percent of the world’s arable land and most of its countries depend on farming as the mainstay of their economies, yet productivity is low, the average size of land holdings is shrinking, soil fertility is declining, fertilizer use is the lowest in the world and rural people are unable to break out of poverty.

Read excerpts from the conclusion of the African Agriculture Status Report 2013, published today by the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa: